How To Make Separation Easier For Children

How To Make Separation Easier For Children?

Divorce and separation are not uncommon these days so many children find themselves living with one parent and having contact with the other.

Issues often arise over the frequency of contact, whether overnight contact should take place, whether and how children should be introduced to a new partner and holiday contact.

Unfortunately, children are often used as pawns in a tactical game played between their parents.

Acrimony between parents can lead to the children feeling miserable because they somehow blame themselves for the breakdown of their parents relationship.

If parents are at war, a child will often feel disloyal if they express a wish to see the parent that they are not living with. It is essential, however, that children continue to enjoy a close and loving relationship with both of their parents.

The National Family Law Organisation Resolution encourages a non confrontational approach to resolving any disputes that arise following the breakdown of a relationship. All of Resolutions members adhere to a strict code of conduct which strives to ensure that issues are dealt with in an amicable way recognising that childrens interests are of paramount importance.

The Government has now recognised the important role that Mediation can play in assisting separated couples to resolve their issues.

On the 6th April 2011, new rules came into force. These rules stipulate that parents attend a Mediation Information Meeting before making any Court Application with regard to children.

It is recognised that not all cases will be suitable for Mediation (e.g. where domestic abuse is alleged). However, in highlighting the need to explore Mediation as a pre requisite to Court proceedings, the Government hopes to encourage parents to look at alterntive and more amicable ways to resolve family disputes.

I am a member of Resolution and would be happy to discuss any issues that you may have. Please call me for a free no obligation chat about your family law matter on 01536 276300 or use our online enquiry form.